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Robert Capon, rise in glory …

Robert Capon, rise in glory …

Alissa Wilkinson remembers Robert Farrar Capon, who died September . From Patheos:

Today I got the sad news that Fr. Robert Farrar Capon, the theologian and writer (most famously of The Supper of the Lamb), has died.

The Supper of the Lamb is the book that has most influenced my own work, as a writer and teacher (and cook!). It is, simply, the most wonderful food-related and possibly theology-related book I’ve ever read.

The Rev. Dr. Jonathan Grieser, frequent commenter on the Café writes at his blog.

One of the great theologians of the Episcopal Church has died. Robert Farrar Capon was the author of one of my favorite books, The Supper of the Lamb, in addition to many others. His vision of grace and of the heavenly banquet continues to inspire and influence me, more than thirty years after I first read it.

“Grace is the celebration of life, relentlessly hounding all the non-celebrants in the world. It is a floating, cosmic bash shouting its way through the streets of the universe, flinging the sweetness of its cassations to every window, pounding at every door in a hilarity beyond all liking and happening, until the prodigals come out at last and dance, and the elder brothers finally take their fingers out of their ears.” ? Robert Farrar Capon, Between Noon & Three: Romance, Law & the Outrage of Grace

“The bread and the pastry, the cheeses and wine, and the sugar go into the Supper of the lamb because we do. It is our love that brings the city home. It is I grant you, an incautious and extravagant hope. But only outlandish hopes can make themselves at home.” ? Robert Farrar Capon, The Supper of the Lamb: A Culinary Reflection

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