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Redskins QB says ‘now is the window’ for gay players in NFL

Redskins QB says ‘now is the window’ for gay players in NFL

In an interview with GQ, Redskins quarterback Robert Griffin III, a devout Christian, says the time is right for gay football players to come out of the closet. (There are no openly gay players in the NFL.) Griffin’s comment:

“Yeah, man. I think there are [gay players] right now, and if they’re looking for a window to just come out, I mean, now is the window. My view on it is, yes, I am a Christian, but to each his own. You do what you want to do. If some Christians want to look at being gay as a sin, then thinking about other women, committing adultery—or any of those other sins that are in the Bible—those are sins, too. And God looks at all of us the same way.”

Here are more outtakes from his GQ interview. Read more at Think Progress.

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Benedict Varnum

JC Fisher, let me gently tease you by asking if you’d point out that an infant who just stood for the first time fell back onto his diaper? A lukewarm statement is a significant lowering of the temperature from hellfire and brimstone. Baby steps are, in my experience, to be applauded for the achievement they are . . . AND for what comes after.

Robert Griffin III has a lot of attention within the NFL right now, and he essentially just cribbed Pope Francis’s “Who am I to judge?” He’s even aware that there are multiple Christian perspectives on homosexuality. AND it really seems that he’s saying (even if he’s doing it without a lot of clarity or eloquence about what theological ground he presumes he’s standing on) that gay players should feel free to come out without negative consequences. Add to that his assertion that there probably are gay players in the NFL, and he’s telling a pretty different story from the sort of machismo that can easily become (and remain) the automatic culture of professional sports.

Weiwen Ng

On the other hand, it’s much, much less than a condemnation, which is the traditional conservative Evangelical position. It’s a significant departure. Previously, many of the NFL players would have been actively hostile. I know this is easy for me to say, as I am straight, but we have to let people be where they are on this issue – remembering that we are winning it.

tgflux

That’s a pretty lukewarm statement by RG3. He says he’s a Christian, and he says “If some Christians want to look at being gay as a sin…” [Note: he doesn’t speak about gay behavior, he says “being gay”: that’s worse than the RCC!]. So what do YOU say about gay people, Robert? Do YOU consider them (or their committed relationships) to be a sin like “committing adultery”?

With friends like you, no wonder any gay players in the NFL are still in the closet. 🙁

JC Fisher

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