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Ramadan Reflections

Ramadan Reflections

Yesterday marked the beginning of Ramadan, the Islamic month of fasting and prayer. In the Huffington Post Religion section, several prominent Muslims offer personal reflections on Ramadan that go beyond fasting, including a reflection on what it means to be human by Qamar Ul Huda of the U.S. Institute of Peace:

In the Bible it is stated ‘Our bodies are the temple of the Holy Spirit which is in us’ (I Cor. 6:19), and in the Qur’an God says, ‘I breathe into him [Adam] My Spirit’ (28:72).

With these verses in mind, the spiritual practices of fasting, prayers, charity, and intense meditation during Ramadan reminds us that our body is a base for the presence of the Spirit. Experiencing the presence of the Spirit reminds us to appreciate the body as sacred as well as rediscover and reconnect the sacredness of nature. The combination of reestablishing our link with nature’s ecology and a deeper God-consciousness (tawhid) fosters a heightened awareness of the One present in all things.

Ramadan’s sacred time re-delivers what it means to be human; it provides insight into knowledge of love, beauty, and truth while living a life of gratitude. Ramadan tells us that cultivating wisdom is beyond dogma and doctrine, rather the focus is on the Spirit.

For the rest of the Ramadan reflections, please visit the Huffington Post here.

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