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Presiding Bishop calls for “a season of prayer”

Presiding Bishop calls for “a season of prayer”

In the wake of multiple terrorist attacks around the world, Presiding Bishop Michal Curry has called for “a season of prayer for regions of the Anglican Communion which are experiencing violence and civil strife.”

The Public Affairs office writes

“In this season of Resurrection, I call on everyone to pray for our brothers and sisters in areas where there is much burden and little hope,” the Presiding Bishop said.

In addition, in his Easter Message 2016 (available here), Presiding Bishop Curry addressed the situation in Brussels, noting, “The truth is even as we speak this Holy Week, we do so not only in the shadow of the cross but we do so in the shadow of those who have been killed in Brussels, of those who have been wounded and maimed, of those who weep and mourn.  And of a world mourning, and not too sure how to move forward.”

Citing Galatians 6:2 – Bear one another’s burdens, and in this way you will fulfil the law of Christ – Presiding Bishop Curry called for prayer throughout the holy season of Easter. Beginning on April 3, the First Sunday of Easter, and proceeding through Pentecost May 15, The Episcopal Church is asked to pray for a particular province or region:

• Burundi
• Central America
• Democratic Republic of the Congo
• Middle East
• Pakistan
• South Sudan

More information is available here; be sure to check back for additional information throughout the Easter season.

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