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Prayers for Kenneth Leech

Prayers for Kenneth Leech

Word comes that priest, writer, and advocate Kenneth Leech is ill:

Kenneth is a brilliant theologian and has written several books which have shaped and formed me the way CS Lewis or John Stott has shaped many Evangelical Christians around the world as well as in The Anglican Communion in general and The Episcopal Church in particular.

The report this morning is that Kenneth is gravely ill in hospital in UK, having suffered a “massive heart attack during a surgical procedure. He remains in ICU but has been removed from respiratory assistance.”

Please, of your kindness and mercy, keep him in your prayers.

The day is rushing toward me – again – as are the thoughts I had hoped to share with you this morning. Let me simply leave you with this quote, which Kenneth used often, as a way to understand the passion and spirituality that is central to Anglo-Catholicism.

Anglo-Catholic liturgy is not just about “smoke and bells”; rather, it is about the incredible mystical reality of God who is both incarnate and present as well as transcendent and mysterious.

h/t Elizabeth Kaeton and Telling Secrets

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