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Prayer and the Berlin Wall

Prayer and the Berlin Wall

In a recent BBC Religion and Ethics piece, Peter Crutchley examines the role of prayer in the fall of the Berlin Wall:

Ignoring death threats and huge banks of armed police, thousands gathered at St Nicholas Church in the East German city of Leipzig on 9 October to pray for peace.

The congregation then joined an estimated crowd of 70,000 on a protest march against the country’s communist regime.

Jump media playerMedia player helpOut of media player. Press enter to return or tab to continue.AdvertisementBBC News, 10 October 1989: Thousands gather in Leipzig protest

It was the largest impromptu demonstration ever witnessed in East Germany, but this was no spontaneous flash mob. It was the culmination of years of weekly prayer meetings organised by Christian Führer, the pastor of St Nicholas.

For the full article from Crutchley, please visit the BBC here.

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