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Post-Catholic padre

Post-Catholic padre

The Miami New Times catches up with Fr. Alberto Cutié:


Alberto Cutie: Post-Catholic Padre

In the Miami New Times, by Gus Garcia-Roberts Thursday, Nov 24 2011

What’s it like to have your name be forever associated with the word canoodling? Father Alberto Cutié — priest, television personality, man who doesn’t mind getting a little sand in his shorts when he makes out on the beach — seems to be taking it in stride.

In case you haven’t spoken to your Hola!-subscribing abuelita since spring 2009, we’ll fill you in. Roman Catholic Miami padre Cutié, who rose to Latin American superstardom — and acquired the dubious nickname “Father Oprah” — by hosting a series of television and radio shows, was snapped by a Mexican tabloid photographer, well, canoodling with a woman on South Beach sands. Cutié admitted to a two-year affair with the woman, and within a month he had ditched the Archdiocese of Miami for the Episcopal Church. That beach lover — Ruhama Buni Canellis — is now his wife and mother to their new daughter.

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tgflux

Excuse me, Miami New Times, but Fr Cutie is Post-Roman, NOT "Post-Catholic"!

JC Fisher

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GrandmèreMimi

His real sin in the eyes of the archdiocese, he believes, was he admitted to the affair rather than conforming to its "culture of secrecy."

In a nutshell.

June Butler

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