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Poll shows rising support for same-sex marriage in Florida & Ohio

Poll shows rising support for same-sex marriage in Florida & Ohio

A recent Washington Post poll shows most voters in the swing states of Ohio and Florida support the right of same-sex couples to wed, as do nearly half the voters in Virginia. The Post reports:

The growing support is a sharp departure from eight years ago, when opposition to gay marriage was so widespread that it may have helped tip the scales in favor of President George W. Bush’s reelection. Today, the politics of the issue is murkier.

In Florida, 54 percent of voters think same-sex marriage should be legal, while 33 percent say it should be illegal. In Ohio, 52 percent say it should be legal, while 37 percent say it should be illegal.

In 2004, by contrast, nearly two-thirds of Ohio voters — 62 percent — supported a constitutional amendment defining marriage as “only a union between one man and one woman.” The Ohio ballot initiative may have driven more voters to the polls who then supported Bush, according to exit surveys.

The Post notes that about two-thirds or more of those younger than 40 support legalizing gay marriage in each state. “Among voters ages 40 to 49, the figure in Florida is 58 percent, but that dips to under half in Ohio and Virginia. Those ages 50 to 64 appear more divided, with a majority of seniors in Ohio and Virginia opposed to gay marriage.”

See full story here.

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