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Pastor’s words that liberate

Pastor’s words that liberate

Rachel Held Evans writes another top 11 list: “11 Things I Wish More Pastors Would Say”. Her first three:

1. “I don’t know.”

2. “I’m sorry. I was wrong. Please forgive me.”

3. “What do you think?”

Held Evans writes: “The irony, of course, is that saying these things not only liberates a congregation; it also liberates the pastor.”

Thoughts?

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Rod Gillis

I would add, to the sometimes needed vocabulary of pastors variations on this theme.

" We need to talk about your behavior and its impact on the community here."

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A Facebook User

Rachel Held Evans is a voice the 'progressive' church needs to hear from, her perspectives from her evangelical upbringing are enlightening.

This list is genius!

Laura Thewalt [added by ed.]

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Richard Edward Helmer

Absolutely spot on, in my view. It not humanizes us to the congregation, but humanizes us to ourselves. And it literally beats the hell out of the ways pride and unrealistic expectations can consume and destroy a pastoral relationship.

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