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On the third morning: a poem

On the third morning: a poem

ON THE THIRD MORNING

John 20:1-18 and Luke 24:1-12

 

On the third morning

The women came first,

Somehow knowing in their wisdom

As women often do!

Anxious with sorrow,

Walking in the stillness of night

Just before dawn

And the movement of day.

 

They came,

Looking for their Lord.

Where they found the stone turned,

Rolled from His tomb.

Their Lord’s body gone,

Taken away!

 

Two disciples came later, to learn

That this was more than an “idle tale,”

Of women, unbelieved.

When entering the tomb, they too saw

 

The linens that once wrapped His body,

Lying where he was laid. Then

Returned home in amazement,

Not recalling the scriptures

Or the words of Jesus,

Even the one whom he most loved.

 

While Mary stayed, weeping outside, to

See angels sitting in the tomb

Where once her Lord’s body lay.

Jesus speaks, calling Mary by name after asking;

“Woman, why do you weep?

 

Whom do you seek?

The living are not

Among the dead.”

She sees him now, Rabbouni, her teacher,

Moving to embrace him, at last knowing his face and voice.

He says; “Hold me not, for I must ascend to my Father.

Go, and tell my brothers, what you have seen and heard.”

 

He has Risen, He has Risen!

He has risen from the places of the dead and dying,

He has risen from the solitude of the tomb.

He has Risen, to his Father and our Father.

He has Risen, to his God and our God.

Hallelujah, Christ is Risen!

 

Let us rise as well, above the noises and distractions of life

to understand that God calls us too to death and resurrection.

Calling us to die immeasurable times;

To die daily in ourselves.

 

Let there be a death to our egos and selfishness,

A death to our poverty of spirit and faithlessness,

A death to doubt, hopelessness, and sorrow,

A death to grief where grief can no longer be borne,

A death to intolerance and “the wish to kill,”

A death to violence and war, and fearful hearts,

A death to abused and unloved hearts.

 

Let there be a death to it all!

Let the illusion and suffering of life be washed away

by the Passion of Christ, creating in us the mind of Christ!

 

So that we me may join with Him

In many Resurrections,

Let there be Resurrections upon Resurrections

One after another and another,

let there be resurrections without end.

 

 

From:

THERE IS SOMETHING ABOUT BEING AN EPISCOPALIAN

By Ron Starbuck

ISBN-13: 978-0-9965231-7-2, ISBN-10: 0-9965231-7-0

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