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Ode to Joy

Ode to Joy

Lord,

it is night.

The night is for stillness

Let us be still in the presence of God.

It is night after a long day.

What has been done has been done;

what has not been done has not been done;

let it be. (A New Zealand Prayer Book Night Prayer p. 184)

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Peter Pearson

Hey, I have the most scathingly brilliant idea!!!

What if Episcopal Churches all over the country started sponsoring this sort of thing and at the end, unfurl one of our "The Episcopal Church Welcomes You" signs? If a bank can do it, we certainly can and imagine the joy we would bring to people. We've got an amazing church just waiting to be discovered!

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Sridgcw

That's a true blessing, especially coming at the end of my day.

One of the best parts: the little girl who came up at the very beginning to put a coin in the bass player's hat, and then stood stock-still, never moving, right in front of the growing group of musicians, as if fixed to the spot.

Sarah Ridgway

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Clint Davis

Ann, thank you so much for this. I had found out some news earlier today about some, lets call it unfinished business that now must be attended to, and I was pretty stressed. This prayer will be with me every night 'til it's done. What a blessing, and may it be returned to you tenfold!

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William R. MacKaye

Ann, what a lovely evening gift to come upon at the Cafe. Thank you for posting it!

Bill MacKaye

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