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Occupy London: a sit-down with Chartres; harsh words on wealth; one bishop’s response

Occupy London: a sit-down with Chartres; harsh words on wealth; one bishop’s response

The @dioceseoflondon reports that Bishop of London Richard Chartres sat down with members of the Occupy London Stock Exchange movement today:


… and addressed a large group of protestors:

Meanwhile, word comes through BBC Radio 4’s “Sunday” program that St. Paul’s Institute (vision: “to foster an informed Christian response to the most urgent ethical and spiritual issues of our times: financial integrity, economic theory, and the meaning of the common good”) has prepared a harshly worded report on the morality of banking – more specifically, executive pay. Initially the report was to be “suppressed” until further notice, but @OccupyLSX says the Dean and Bishop are promising its release.

Unless a switch has quietly occurred, Giles Fraser (formerly of the cathedral) is still the Director of the St. Paul’s Institute.

Finally, Bishop of Buckingham Alan Wilson breaks ranks with many Church of England clergy to talk about the Occupy London movement:

Asked about the role of the church as a conduit for conversation, Wilson says,

What is the value of a religious institution if it loses touch with what it was there for in the first place?

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Apps 55753818692 1675970731 F785b701a6d1b8c33f0408

“What is the value of a religious institution if it loses touch with what it was there for in the first place?”

Truer words have not been said. Amen!

-Cullin R. Schooley

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