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Non-partisan panel: US engaged in torture post-9/11

Non-partisan panel: US engaged in torture post-9/11

Scott Shane of The New York Times reports:

A nonpartisan, independent review of interrogation and detention programs in the years after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks concludes that “it is indisputable that the United States engaged in the practice of torture” and that the nation’s highest officials bore ultimate responsibility for it.

The sweeping, 577-page report says that while brutality has occurred in every American war, there never before had been “the kind of considered and detailed discussions that occurred after 9/11 directly involving a president and his top advisers on the wisdom, propriety and legality of inflicting pain and torment on some detainees in our custody.” The study, by an 11-member panel convened by the Constitution Project, a legal research and advocacy group, is to be released on Tuesday morning.

Do the report’s finds trouble you? Can torture be morally justified?

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billydinpvd

Trouble, yes, but they don’t surprise me – it was evident that we had tortured people in all but name.

And no, torture cannot be morally justified. At the risk of proof-texting, Romans 3:8 is pretty clear that “Let us do evil so that good may come” is not an example of Christian morality.

Bill Dilworth

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