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Nashville police chief offers message of grace in Christmas address

Nashville police chief offers message of grace in Christmas address

Steve Anderson, Chief of Police in Nashville, TN posted a Christmas message praising his officers response to protests related to the death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo.  He thanked them for their restraint and professionalism.

Over the last weeks, across the nation, and here in Nashville, we have witnessed many protests and demonstrations.  Some of the demonstrations have been peaceful.  Some have been violent, with significant property damage.  Here in Nashville, persons have gathered to express their thoughts in a non-violent manner.  I thank all involved for the peaceful manner in which they have conducted themselves.

I also thank you.  As a member of the Metropolitan Nashville Police Department, you have responded to these events in a manner that clearly shows that this is a professional police department staffed by professional individuals who respect the points of view of all persons.  Again, thank you for showing the Nashville public that, individually and collectively, they have a police department they can be proud of.

 

And then he went on to share an email he had received from a citizen complaining about the police response to the protests in Nashville, expressing frustration that protesters had been allowed to block the interstate and protest for hours on a separate occasion with no arrests.  The Chief’s response was to point out the need for reconciliation and acceptance of other points of view being the foundations of a just society.

While I don’t doubt that you sincerely believe that your thoughts represent the majority of citizens, I would ask you to consider the following before you chisel those thoughts in stone.

As imperfect humans, we have a tendency to limit our association with other persons to those persons who are most like us.  Unfortunately, there is even more of a human tendency to stay within our comfort zone by further narrowing those associations to those persons who share our thoughts and opinions.  By doing this we can avoid giving consideration to thoughts and ideas different than our own.  This would make us uncomfortable.  By considering only the thoughts and ideas we are in agreement with, we stay in our comfort zone.  Our own biases get reinforced and reflected back at us leaving no room for any opinion but our own.  By doing this, we often convince ourselves that the majority of the world shares opinion and that anyone with another opinion is, obviously, wrong.

It is only when we go outside that comfort zone, and subject ourselves to the discomfort of considering thoughts we don’t agree with, that we can make an informed judgment on any matter.  We can still disagree and maintain our opinions, but we can now do so knowing that the issue has been given consideration from all four sides.  Or, if we truly give fair consideration to all points of view, we may need to swallow our pride and amend our original thoughts.

And, it is only by giving consideration to the thoughts of all persons, even those that disagree with us, that we can have an understanding as to what constitutes a majority.

 

Further noting;

First, it is laudable that you are teaching your son respect for the police and other authority figures.  However, a better lesson might be that it is the government the police serve that should be respected.  The police are merely a representative of a government formed by the people for the people—for all people.  Being respectful of the government would mean being respectful of all persons, no matter what their views.

Later, it might be good to point out that the government needs to be, and is, somewhat flexible, especially in situations where there are minor violations of law.  A government that had zero tolerance for even minor infractions would prove unworkable in short order.

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Monte Waddill

We continue to pray for peace and respect to bring calm and safety for everyone.

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