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More U.S. Christians turn ‘churchless’

More U.S. Christians turn ‘churchless’

From Religion News Service:

If you’re dismayed that one in five Americans (20 percent) are “nones” — people who claim no particular religious identity — brace yourself.

How does 38 percent sound?


That’s what religion researcher David Kinnaman calculates when he adds “the unchurched, the never-churched and the skeptics” to the nones.

He calls his new category “churchless,” the same title Kinnaman has given his new book. By his count, roughly four in 10 people living in the continental United States are actually “post-Christian” and “essentially secular in belief and practice.”

If asked, the “churchless” would likely check the “Christian” box on a survey, even though they may not have darkened the door of a church in years.

Read more.

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John F Miller

Take these number with a grain of salt. By Kinnaman's narrow definitions many committed Episcopalians won't qualify as Christian.

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