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Memorial Day: I had a simple impulse to cut into the earth

Memorial Day: I had a simple impulse to cut into the earth

The Vietnam War Memorial, designed by Maya Lin when she was a 21-year-old senior at Yale University, sparked controversy when it opened in 1982, but in the 31 years since then, it has become a site of pilgrimage, and perhaps the cherished of all the monuments and memorials on the National Mall.


In a November 2000 article in the New York Review of Books Lin explained the thinking behind her great work. Here are two excerpts:

But on a personal level, I wanted to focus on the nature of accepting and coming to terms with a loved one’s death. Simple as it may seem, I remember feeling that accepting a person’s death is the first step in being able to overcome that loss.

I felt that as a culture we were extremely youth-oriented and not willing or able to accept death or dying as a part of life. The rites of mourning, which in more primitive and older cultures were very much a part of life, have been suppressed in our modern times. In the design of the memorial, a fundamental goal was to be honest about death, since we must accept that loss in order to begin to overcome it. The pain of the loss will always be there, it will always hurt, but we must acknowledge the death in order to move on.

and

I had a simple impulse to cut into the earth.

I imagined taking a knife and cutting into the earth, opening it up, an initial violence and pain that in time would heal. The grass would grow back, but the initial cut would remain a pure flat surface in the earth with a polished, mirrored surface, much like the surface on a geode when you cut it and polish the edge. The need for the names to be on the memorial would become the memorial; there was no need to embellish the design further. The people and their names would allow everyone to respond and remember.

It would be an interface, between our world and the quieter, darker, more peaceful world beyond. I chose black granite in order to make the surface reflective and peaceful. I never looked at the memorial as a wall, an object, but as an edge to the earth, an opened side. The mirrored effect would double the size of the park, creating two worlds, one we are a part of and one we cannot enter. The two walls were positioned so that one pointed to the Lincoln Memorial and the other pointed to the Washington Monument. By linking these two strong symbols for the country, I wanted to create a unity between the nation’s past and present.

The idea of destroying the park to create something that by its very nature should commemorate life seemed hypocritical, nor was it in my nature. I wanted my design to work with the land, to make something with the site, not to fight it or dominate it. I see my works and their relationship to the landscape as being an additive rather than a combative process.

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tgflux

I also remember the terrible racism that Lin faced at the time of the announcement of her winning design, between outright fury (as if an Asian American could have something say about a war fought in Asia?), and sexualized patronizing ("Hey Mama-san!"). She endured it w/ tremendous grace.

...but by the time the Memorial opened, just about EVERYBODY realized Lin was right, and her critics were wrong.

JC Fisher

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