Support the Café
Search our site

Members of Congress go back to school

Members of Congress go back to school

The head of the US Jesuit Conference has written to the Congressional alumni of Jesuit schools, urging them to do more on immigration reform, and live up to the principles they were taught in school.

The Jesuits specifically called for an end to deportations, and more aid for the victims of human trafficking, and unaccompanied minors who came to this company seeking asylum. The letter was sent to 12 Republicans and 31 Democrats in the House who were Jesuit-educated, and was written by the Rev. Thomas Smolich, the US head of the order.

“We must welcome the refugee, the victim of trafficking, the child who has been abused or abandoned,” Smolich wrote in the July 29 letter. “Let us follow in the footsteps of Jesus when he said, ‘Let the children come to me, and do not prevent them; for the kingdom of heaven belongs to such as these.’”

Rev. Smolich’s letter didn’t achieve exactly what he wanted; Congress couldn’t manage to pass any sort of legislation on this issue, and went into recess for the rest of the summer.

Read the whole article in the Huffington Post here.

Dislike (0)
Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmail

Café Comments?

Our comment policy requires that you use your real first and last names and provide an email address (your email will not be published). Comments that use non-PG rated language, include personal attacks, that are not provable as fact or that we deem in any way to be counter to our mission of fostering respectful dialogue will not be posted.

Facebooktwitterrss
Support the Café
Past Posts

The Episcopal Café seeks to be an independent voice, reporting and reflecting on the Episcopal Church and the Anglican tradition.  The Café is not a platform of advocacy, but it does aim to tell the story of the church from the perspective of Progressive Christianity.  Our collective sympathy, as the Café, lies with the project of widening the circle of inclusion within the church and empowering all the baptized for the role to which they have been called as followers of Christ.

The opinions expressed at the Café are those of individual contributors, and, unless otherwise noted, should not be interpreted as official statements of a parish, diocese or other organization. The art and articles that appear here remain the property of their creators.

All Content  © 2017 Episcopal Café