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Matthew Shepherd’s parents share a letter from Coretta Scott King

Matthew Shepherd’s parents share a letter from Coretta Scott King

A lot has happened in the last couple of days. The 78th General Convention of the Episcopal Church opened in Salt lake City UT and the US Supreme Court released a decision bringing marriage equality for GLBT folk in the USA. President Obama delivered a eulogy in Charleston SC on Friday for the slain pastor of Emanuel AME Church, the Revd Clementa Pinckney. One of the events that was perhaps missed by most was that the parents of Matthew Shepherd released a letter of consolation for the death of their son that they received from Coretta Scott King dated 13 OCT 1998.

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posted by David Allen

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Cynthia Katsarelis

Yesterday at the Marriage Equality Rally at the steps of the Colorado State Capitol building, a woman who is a leader in both gay and African American liberation spoke that now perhaps we can find "intersections."

My fervent prayer is that the liberation movements work together. I find this letter to be inspiring, and a beacon for us, if we chose to look and act.

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