Support the Café
Search our site

Marriage Equality comes to WI, what will church do?

Marriage Equality comes to WI, what will church do?

Fr, Johnathan Grieser, a priest in Wisconsin, has been noting the progress made towards marriage equality on his blog.

He also notes, however, the sad lack of a unified response to the events of this past week, when the US District court struck down the same-sex marriage ban as unconstitutional. He points out that as these bans fell all across the country, it should have become evident that it was going to happen in Wisconsin, and the local church would need to respond. Yet, there was no proactive conversation.


He writes:

As Episcopal clergy and as a church, we have painted ourselves into a very small corner. It’s going to be increasingly difficult for our congregations to claim to be open and welcoming to LGBT Christians when we refuse to extend the sacrament of marriage to them. As clergy, we are no longer going to be able to use the excuse that same sex marriage is forbidden in the state constitution when couples approach us to solemnize their vows. In retrospect, it would have been helpful to have had frank conversations about this in the past months. Instead, we dithered and kept our mouths shut.

Read the full post here.

How about where you are? Is your local church being proactive in advance of the laws changing?

Dislike (0)
0 0 vote
Article Rating
Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmail

Café Comments?

Our comment policy requires that you use your real first and last names and provide an email address (your email will not be published). Comments that use non-PG rated language, include personal attacks, that are not provable as fact or that we deem in any way to be counter to our mission of fostering respectful dialogue will not be posted.

7 Comments
Newest
Oldest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
David Allen

Megan, the Wisconsin State Supreme Court is not who ruled the marriage ban unconstitutional, it was U.S. District Judge Barbara Crabb. She also refused to stay her decision today and so the marriages continue at this point unless a higher court calls a halt until the ruling can be appealed.

Bro David

Like (0)
Dislike (0)
tgflux

FWIW, my choice location for marrying in Wisconsin!

http://www.dekovencenter.org/weddings

JC Fisher

Like (0)
Dislike (0)
tgflux

I would think that *some dioceses* in Wisconsin would be far more affirmative of their clergy&parishes blessing/presiding at same-sex marriages than others? [If my memory of TEC in Wisconsin holds...]

JC Fisher

Like (0)
Dislike (0)
Christian Paolino - Integrity USA

LGBT Episcopalians who organize and work together with church leaders can sometimes achieve a more coordinated response. In Oregon, local Integrity leaders had been campaigning in congregations for months to help people prepare. The day the ruling occurred there was a public event with the diocesan bishop and Gene Robinson in attendance.

We found out about Wisconsin on the news, not from anybody within the church in that state. I know every diocese is different, but we are a lean, membership-driven organization and we can only help where we have local people willing to work with us.

We would love to work with more LGBT people and their allies and loved ones in places like Wisconsin. If this issue is important to you, please be in conversation with us.

Christian Paolino

Stakeholders' Council Chair

IntegrityUSA

Like (0)
Dislike (0)
Brian Kneeland

We were married by an Episcopal priest here in Maryland. It was a wonderful affirmation of our beliefs as well as a recognition of the validity of our relationship! Our parish accepts us totally!

Like (0)
Dislike (0)
Facebooktwitterrss
Support the Café
Past Posts
2020_001

The Episcopal Café seeks to be an independent voice, reporting and reflecting on the Episcopal Church and the Anglican tradition.  The Café is not a platform of advocacy, but it does aim to tell the story of the church from the perspective of Progressive Christianity.  Our collective sympathy, as the Café, lies with the project of widening the circle of inclusion within the church and empowering all the baptized for the role to which they have been called as followers of Christ.

The opinions expressed at the Café are those of individual contributors, and, unless otherwise noted, should not be interpreted as official statements of a parish, diocese or other organization. The art and articles that appear here remain the property of their creators.

All Content  © 2017 Episcopal Café