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Looking for light in dark times

Looking for light in dark times

Marking five years since the horrific tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementary, an Episcopal author and her son (a survivor of that day) have released a new book The Child of Faith: Raising a Spiritual Child in a Secular World, that hopes to share some of the resilience they have found in their faith journey

 

Authors, Sophfronia Scott and Tain Gregory take the events of that tragic day, but also the years preceding it, and the days of recovery and healing that followed, Sophfronia and Tain share stories, experiences and ideas to help parents get to the heart of the question: How do you help a child have faith—real faith that they own—in the challenging world we live in today?

 

“This book we feel is a message of hope,” says Sophfronia. “By sharing our story we hope other families will see it is possible to help their children have spiritual lives in this very secular day and age. And that spirituality really can help in dark times.”

 

The book shares insights from their family’s spiritual awakening, a journey that led to a deep experience of God and a new way of life in the world. Not only do they offer practical advice on faith formation, but they tackle a difficult question: How does faith prepare us not only life’s joys but for its most shocking tragedies? The answer is deceptively simple: by paying attention to the Spirit and trusting one another.

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