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Living at a slower pace ‘off the grid’

Living at a slower pace ‘off the grid’

At the On Being web site, a story of someone who unplugged herself from the grid to work in Ireland, in the L’Arche system of community-building ministering to someone with Down Syndrome, and being ministered to.

The “no expectations” part of my journey was key. Within hours of arriving to my new home, I realized that had I any, they would have been dashed and smashed beyond recognition. I had paid a therapist for two years to continually hear her tell me to “slow down.” Suddenly, I was standing at the bottom of the stairs waiting for Michael, whose name is changed for reasons of privacy, to make his way down the stairs to a ready-made breakfast that was already beginning to cool as he took step by slow step by slow step. Then he paused, and went back upstairs to change his socks. Hours after waking him that morning, a cold breakfast consumed, we made our way through town to work at a turtle’s pace. Only then did I recognize the beauty of this moment; he, 65 years of age and having outlived most with Down syndrome, tipped his hat at people who passed him by and embraced and smiled at those friends of his we met along the way.

What in the world was I rushing off to work for anyway, when it made me pass by these people, these neighbors, these new and old friends in this amazing and unique thing we call life. Later that night I laughed to myself as Michael and I slowly, and together, washed him for bed. I made sure his socks were on to his liking and that his pillow was arranged just right. There is no rush, I breathed to myself, as he stopped, took a look at me, and put his hand on my head and sang to himself, “Lord have mercy.” The perfect blessing to end the day.

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Paige, thanks for the note. The story has been updated with a link to the original story, which for some odd reason I left out when editing. Also available here.

Torey Lightcap

Paige Baker

Torey–is this the story you reference?

L’Arche: A Community of Brokenness and Beauty

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