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Linsanity vs. Tebowmania

Linsanity vs. Tebowmania

Stephen Prothero of Boston University compares and contrasts the way Jeremy Lin communicates his faith on and off the basketball court with the apporach of another evangelical sports celebrity Tim Tebow.

Although he led Palo Alto High School to a state championship in basketball, major college programs did not want Lin. And after he blew away the competition at Harvard, the NBA didn’t seem particularly interested either. Undrafted, he warmed the bench at Golden State, then Houston and then New York before getting his big break this year with the Knicks.

Second, like Tebow, Lin came out of nowhere to bring a dying team back from the dead. While Tebow turned around the Denver Broncos at quarterback, Lin has led the previously struggling Knicks at point guard to five straight victories, each with 20 points or more. And his field goal percentage during this winning streak tops 50%, not bad for a guy who supposedly can’t shoot.

Third, Lin is also a born-again Christian whose fans love him as much for cultural and religious intangibles as for his ability in his sport.

In a 2010 interview with Timothy Dalrymple of Patheos.com, Lin said he was raised in the church and became a Christian in high school. In college, he played “for the glory of God.” After his career-high 38 point performance against Kobe Bryant and the Lakers, he said, “I just give all the praise to God.”

But there is a difference:

Lin also differs from Tebow in his approach to the faith, which is more subtle. On his Facebook page, Lin does quote Colossians 3:23: “Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for men.” But the “Taiwanese Tebow” doesn’t “Tebow” after a game. His evangelism is decidedly low key.

In this way, Lin is a reminder that, like Christians themselves, athletic evangelicals come in all shapes and sizes.

Scholars of religion have been observing for years that the Christian tradition is rapidly moving south and east, finding its new home not so much in Europe or in the United States as in Asia and Africa and Latin America.

Lin exemplifies this trend, even as he reminds us that American Christianity is changing its face, too. The Asian immigration boom that began with the opening up of immigration in 1965 did wonders for Buddhism and Hinduism, to be sure. But it brought far more Christians to American shores, many of them (like Lin) non-denominational evangelicals.

Down the road, Lin will probably get some of the same grief that Tebow has gotten for his outspoken faith. And if he is as human as that faith says he is, his shots are going to clang off the rim some day, and with it some of the sheen on his celebrity. In other words, there is at least as much insanity in Jeremania as there was in the cult of Tim Tebow. To believe in either guy takes a little bit of faith.

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Lelanda Lee

If one were to characterize Jeremy Lin's ethnicity, I think that calling him Taiwanese-American would be appropriate, because of his paternal line's immigration to Taiwan in the early 18th century, and it would also be appropriate to call him Chinese-American due to his maternal line's immigration to Taiwan in the mid-20th century.

However, the problem I have with calling Jeremy Lin the "Taiwanese Tebow" is that it is racism based on Tebow somehow being the standard or the norm, and Lin being someone who has now somehow measured up to that standard or norm. As some sports commentators have pointed out, Lin is the real deal in terms of ability with a basketball and a team player who leads his team from within the group of players on the court to stellar wins.

Lelanda Lee, a Chinese-American whose mother and paternal grandparents immigrated to the U.S. in the 20th century.

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Kraut1701

Lin's not the "Taiwanese Tebow." Perpetuating that moniker is racist. Lin is more American than Tebow is, considering that he was born in the US and Tebow was born in the Philippines.

Morris Post

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