LGBT advocates win right to organize at Kenyan High Court; Anglican Archbishop Wabukala dismayed

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On Friday, April 24, Kenya’s High Court ruled that LGBT advocacy groups have the right to organize. Many religious officials, including Anglican Archbishop Eliud Wabukala, believe that this ruling threatens the “family unit”organization of Kenyan society:

Every person has the right to freedom of association, which includes the right to form, join or participate in the activities of an association of any kind,” the judges ruled, quoting Article 36 of Kenya’s constitution.

Kenyan laws bans homosexuality, and many clergy regularly preach against it as sin before God. But the ruling means that LGBT Kenyans will have an official platform from which to fight for their rights and freedoms.

“This is what we have been crying for,” said the Rev. Michael Kimindu, a former Anglican priest and now president of Other Sheep-Africa, a gay rights organization. “It is the beginning of the journey towards freedom. We will now start asking: What happens when two people who are gay want to have a baby or want to go to church to marry?”…

Anglican Archbishop Eliud Wabukala, too, was troubled by the ruling, saying Kenyan society is organized around “family units,” not gay rights groups.

“The judgment was made with very narrow considerations and it is not only against Christianity, but also against Muslims’ teachings and traditions,” said Wabukala, who leads Kenya’s 4.5 million Anglican Christians, the country’s largest Protestant denomination.

The Daily Nation reports

Dr Wabukala urged the Registrar of Societies not to honour the court order requiring the government to allow for registration of an umbrella organisation for gays and lesbians.


Posted by Weston Matthews

 

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Cynthia Katsarelis
Member

I would love to see the Anglican Communion set up a human rights task force. In fact, I would like to see that conditional for our $1 million+ contribution.

It certainly would help in addressing the Five Marks of Mission. But yes, it might also expose some issues. For example, Human Rights Watch says that the path to peace between Christians and Muslims in Nigeria includes removing discriminatory laws and working towards equitable processes and a functional justice system. They don't mention anything about a need for Christians and Muslims to share a common scapegoat in LGBT people, as certain Nigerian, Ugandan, and Kenyan bishops would have us believe...

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JC Fisher
Guest
JC Fisher

“This is what we have been crying for,” said the Rev. Michael Kimindu, a former Anglican priest and now president of Other Sheep-Africa, a gay rights organization.

If the good reverend has lost his credential in the Anglican Church of Kenya (apparently due to his fidelity to Christ's Gospel), perhaps he can be accredited by TEC (or a bishop therein)? Hint, hint...

God bless Rev Michael, and God's LGBT children in Kenya!

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