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Less institutional, more networked

Less institutional, more networked

A new Pew Research Center survey conducted Feb. 14-23, 2014 among 1,821 adults nationwide, including 617 Millennial adults, and analysis of other Pew Research Center surveys conducted between 1990 and 2014.

The Millennial generation is forging a distinctive path into adulthood. Now ranging in age from 18 to 33, they are relatively unattached to organized politics and religion, linked by social media, burdened by debt, distrustful of people, in no rush to marry— and optimistic about the future.

They are also America’s most racially diverse generation. In all of these dimensions, they are different from today’s older generations. And in many, they are also different from older adults back when they were the age Millennials are now.

Pew Research Center surveys show that half of Millennials (50%) now describe themselves as political independents and about three-in-ten (29%) say they are not affiliated with any religion. These are at or near the highest levels of political and religious disaffiliation recorded for any generation in the quarter-century that the Pew Research Center has been polling on these topics….

Millennials have also been keeping their distance from another core institution of society—marriage. Just 26% of this generation is married. When they were the age that Millennials are now, 36% of Generation X, 48% of Baby Boomers and 65% of the members of the Silent Generation were married. (See box on page 10 for demographic portraits of America’s four adult generations). Most unmarried Millennials (69%) say they would like to marry, but many, especially those with lower levels of income and education, lack what they deem to be a necessary prerequisite—a solid economic foundation.

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Donald Schell

Reading the whole survey summary -

http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2014/03/07/millennials-in-adulthood/

it seems promising to me rather than otherwise. Networked rather than slotted into set institutional places, politically unaffiliated but steadily liberal-leaning on issues and voting choices, a high proportion actually believing in God (with a pleasingly Anglican decline in the number who "are absolutely certain God exists"). Startling optimistic despite all kinds of things they look at unblinkingly. Some of these young people will make the church's future, may change us in unexpected ways, but likely also ready to challenge and bless us.

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