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Lent Madness mentioned in Sports Illustrated

Lent Madness mentioned in Sports Illustrated

Congratulations to the folks behind the Lent Madness program. This week Sports Illustrated mentions their work in an article on how brackets are going mainstream.

“Like most people, I’ve been checking my brackets. I don’t mean my NCAA tournament brackets; the teams I had penciled into the Sweet 16 and Elite Eight, such as Duke, Missouri and UNLV, fell so early that I took a moment of silence to mourn the demise of my chances of winning the office pool. Those brackets are now lying in state, deader than the crowd at an NIT game. May they rest in peace.

No, I’m referring to my favorite brackets, the ones that hold my interest long after my Final Four picks have been eliminated. I’m following the Movie Quoter tournament on Facebook, where “Make My Day” is headed for a showdown with “May the Force Be with You” that could rival Duke-Kentucky in 1992. I’m also tracking the Ultimate Southern Food bracket in Garden & Gun magazine—whose target demographic must be readers with green thumbs and itchy trigger fingers—where I’m picking Pulled Pork to emerge from a weak Barbecue region and reach the Final Four. I am also religiously following lentmadness.org’s bracket to determine which saint deserves the Golden Halo. (In their highly anticipated Saintly Sixteen meeting, Joan of Arc couldn’t put much heat on Mary Magdalene.)”

Read on here.

Nice!

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