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Kenya Archbishop condemns attacks on Sunday school

Kenya Archbishop condemns attacks on Sunday school

From Anglican Communion News Service:

Following the explosive attack at Anglican Church of Kenya St. Polycarp Parish on Juja Road in Nairobi yesterday, Archbishop Dr. Eliud Wabukala joined other religious leaders in condemning the explosive attack.

Earlier in the day, Archbishop Wabukala, and Bishop Joel Waweru of Nairobi Diocese visited and prayed with four of the six children still admitted at Kenyatta National Hospital, Children’s Ward.

In a statement released today at the scene of the explosion, he stated that Kenya is a multi- religious society and termed the attacks as atrocities whose perpetrators should face the full rigor of the law. He called upon the Government to offer adequate security since asking citizens to be vigilant is not sufficient. “This is a cruel provocation, but I appeal to Christians not to feed violence with violence, either in word or deed, because we are called to overcome evil with good,” he remarked.

Nairobi Provincial Commissioner Mr. Njoroge Ndirangu and Supreme Council of Kenyan Muslims Secretary General Sheikh Adan Wachu gathered at the scene and expressed their disapproval of the of the heinous act.

Bishop Waweru and Provincial Commissioner Ndirangu later visited the bereaved family who lost a nine year old son, Ian Maina. Ian succumbed to injuries after the explosive device was hurled at their Sunday school class blowing the roof off. The assailants escaped on foot in a nearby path.

From WalesOnline news:

An explosive device set off in a Sunday school class in Kenya has killed one child and seriously wounded three.

Acting police chief Moses Ombati said he suspects sympathisers with the Somali militant group al-Shabab were behind the attack at an Anglican church in the capital Nairobi

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