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John Stott, R.I.P.

John Stott, R.I.P.

John Stott died in his retirement home at St. Barnabas College at 3.15pm on Wednesday 27th July. He was surrounded by Frances Whitehead, and a number of good friends. They were reading the Scriptures and listening to Handel’s Messiah when he peacefully went to be with his Lord and Saviour according to All Souls, Langham Place where there is a tribute to him.


Patheos remembers Stott here:

Stott demonstrated spiritual leadership not because he built an organization or led an institution. He led by planting the seeds of truth—widely, deeply, continually, over a period of decades. In John Stott’s final public address he raised the question: what are we trying to do in the mission? In his mind the answer was unambiguous: to help people become more like Christ.

Other links:

Intervarsity Press

Christianity Today

More from Christianity Today

Brook Network

John Stott comments on Twitter

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The Archbishop of Canterbury has offered comment: “‘The death of John Stott will be mourned by countless Christians throughout the world. During a long life of unsparing service and witness, John won a unique place in the hearts of all who encountered him, whether in person or through his many books. He was a man of rare graciousness and deep personal kindness, a superb communicator and a sensitive and skilled counsellor. Without ever compromising his firm evangelical faith, he showed himself willing to challenge some of the ways in which that faith had become conventional or inward-looking. It is not too much to say that he helped to change the face of evangelicalism internationally, arguing for the necessity of ‘holistic’ mission that applied the Gospel of Jesus to every area of life, including social and political questions. But he will be remembered most warmly as an expositor of scripture and a teacher of the faith, whose depth and simplicity brought doctrine alive in all sorts of new ways.”

“We give thanks to God for his life and for all that was given to us through his ministry.”

tgflux

Ambivalent about him in many ways (theology/ethics/churchmanship), but may he rest in peace, and rise in glory.

JC Fisher

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