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Jesus was a child who fled violence in his home country

Jesus was a child who fled violence in his home country

In the midst of debate about immigrant children crossing the U.S. border from Central America, the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings notes that “the baby Jesus survived Herod’s massacre because his parents took him across a border to a land where he was safe. Just like parents in Central America who are sending their children away, Mary and Joseph took great risks so their son could survive.” She writes at Religion News Service:

As politicians focus on midterm elections rather than on children in crisis, it’s worth remembering: Christians worship a child who fled from violence in his home country.

The Gospel of Matthew recounts the story of King Herod of Judea, who slaughtered all the babies and toddlers around Bethlehem in a desperate attempt to prevent the reign of Jesus — the child he had been told would become a king.

Every year right after Christmas, Christians commemorate this horror, called the Massacre of the Innocents. “Receive … into the arms of your mercy all innocent victims; and by your great might frustrate the designs of evil tyrants,” we pray.

Jennings is the president of the Episcopal Church’s lay and clergy House of Deputies and is a member of the worldwide Anglican Consultative Council. Read her full column here.

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Donna Hicks

While this situation should be given our serious consideration and prayer and support through Episcopal Relief & Development, I'd just like to say that children in Gaza have nowhere to flee right now.

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Donna Hicks

While this situation should be given our serious consideration and prayer and support through Episcopal Relief & Development, I'd just like to say that children in Gaza have nowhere to flee right now.

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John B. Chilton

This is an issue where I see little daylight between Democrats and Republicans. And the reason is it politicians view it as a third rail -- something they don't want to touch for fear of the result in the next election cycle. That says more about the majority of voters than it says about the parties.

NPR's Steve Inskeep did a very good job of trying to get White House advisor Cecilia Muñoz to answer why the influx at the border is not a political refugee problem. It's apparent the administration intends to return nearly all of these children to their country of origin.

http://www.npr.org/2014/07/09/330038061/administration-moves-to-speed-deportations-of-unaccompanied-minors

MUNOZ: We are certainly going to cut down the period of time. That's the intention here, again, is to make sure that for those kids who end up being removable - and we think that's probably going to be a majority of the kids in this situation - that they don't remain in the United States for years and that we cut down the amount of time that it takes.

INSKEEP: Of course there's a flipside to speeding up the deportation hearings and that is that some kids or their advocates may be able to make a case for them to stay because they have relatives here, because they'd like to seek political asylum, any number of other reasons. Are you prepared for the possibility that a very large percentage of the children that you're dealing with may actually end up staying permanently in the United States?

MUNOZ: We think it's unlikely. But the purpose of the law is to protect people who need protecting. And we're very serious about the. But, look, the standards for political asylum are very high. If you look at the history of these kinds of cases and apply them to the situation, it seems very unlikely that a majority of these children are going to have the ability to stay in the United States.

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Richard III

Mr. Obama's presidency has brought out the racism in an awful lot of people, it's been present and on display for anyone who has taken the time to notice. The Republicans in Congress have shown how unconcerned they are about working to solve this country's problems preferring instead show their backsides to everyone who doesn't agree with them and trying as hard as they can to make the President look like a failure at every opportunity. Their behavior should make a lot of white people feel ashamed to be white but I haven't seen it. I also think it's interesting that a solid majority of his detractors would call themselves Christian, LOL. I guess their selective reading of scripture doesn't include the Gospels.

Richard Warren

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Richard III

Mr. Obama's presidency has brought out the racism in an awful lot of people, it's been present and on display for anyone who has taken the time to notice. The Republicans in Congress have shown how unconcerned they are about working to solve this country's problems preferring instead show their backsides to everyone who doesn't agree with them and trying as hard as they can to make the President look like a failure at every opportunity. Their behavior should make a lot of white people feel ashamed to be white but I haven't seen it. I also think it's interesting that a solid majority of his detractors would call themselves Christian, LOL. I guess their selective reading of scripture doesn't include the Gospels.

Richard Warren

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