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James Fenhagen died on Thursday

James Fenhagen died on Thursday

The Rev. Canon James C. Fenhagen died on Thursday in South Carolina. Fenhagen was known to many within the Episcopal Church because of his leadership in clergy education and parish development.


From his obituary in the Charleston South Carolina newspaper:

Fenhagen served as Rector of several parishes in Maryland, the District of Columbia, and at St. Michael and All Angels’ Episcopal Church in Columbia SC before becoming active in academic settings. He was Director of the Church and Ministry Program at the Hartford Seminary Foundation. He was named President and Dean of the General Theological Seminary in New York City in 1978 and retired from there in 1992. He then became Director of the Cornerstone Project of the Episcopal Church Foundation, retiring in 1995. He came out of retirement to serve as President and Warden of the College of Preachers at Washington National Cathedral, from 2001-2004. He authored five books and lectured at and led conferences in the US and abroad.

Praise God for faithful servants who have finished their course in faith. May he rest in peace and rise gloriously in the day of the Resurrection.

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