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Is your religious liberty being threatened? Maybe. Maybe not.

Is your religious liberty being threatened? Maybe. Maybe not.

Although it first ran nearly two years ago on Huffington Post, “How to Determine If Your Religious Liberty Is Being Threatened in Just 10 Quick Questions” finds new resonances in light of gun love, equal marriage, Hobby Lobby – well, just about anything in recent news that you could file under Religious Freedom. This blogger liked it enough to share it on Facebook in the morning, and by the middle of the afternoon it had been shared 49 times.


It hits a raw nerve and succinctly twists it:

Just pick “A” or “B” for each question.

1. My religious liberty is at risk because:

A) I am not allowed to go to a religious service of my own choosing.

B) Others are allowed to go to religious services of their own choosing.

….

4. My religious liberty is at risk because:

A) I am not allowed to pray privately.

B) I am not allowed to force others to pray the prayers of my faith publicly.

and this well-tuned finale:

Religious liberty is never secured by a campaign of religious superiority. The only way to ensure your own religious liberty remains strong is by advocating for the religious liberty of all, including those with whom you may passionately disagree. Because they deserve the same rights as you. Nothing more. Nothing less.

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