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If Jesus lived today, he’d be a beer drinker, says priest

If Jesus lived today, he’d be a beer drinker, says priest

Episcopal priest and bar owner William Miller has a new book out, “The Beer Drinker’s Guide to God, The Whole and Holy Truth About Lager, Loving, and Living.” He contends that if Jesus had not lived in Palestine, his first miracle might well have been turning water into beer. From thedrinksbusiness.com:

Father Bill Miller, a writer, bar owner and Episcopal priest from Texas, who currently lives in Hawaii, counts God and “strong drink” among two of his favourite things, and has imparted his wisdom for how both can live side by side his most recent book.

The book contains a series of humorous essays by the priest-slash-bar owner including WWJD: What Would Jesus Drink?, Brewed Over Me and Distill Me, O Lord, Pearls of Great Price and Chicken Soup for the Hooters Girl’s Soul.

So sure is Miller of the value of beer that if Jesus was alive today, he’s pretty sure he would have turned water into beer rather than wine, had he not lived in Palestine.

Read more.

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Paul Woodrum

And if Jesus, at the Last Supper, had chosen to give thanks over the desert course rather than the bread course, we might have chocolate chip cookies to go with our beer.

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