Support the Café
Search our site

Hope and peace in a violent world

Hope and peace in a violent world

Rabbi Matthew Gevirtz, Bishop Mark Beckwith and Imam Deen Shareet appear on a “Faith on Fridays” segment on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe.” They talk about the aftermath of the Newtown shootings, the times when God transcends the limits of our faith, and how working together the Newark Interfaith Coalition for Hope and Peace has reached out in the wake of the violent gun deaths of young people in their city.


Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

0 0 vote
Article Rating
Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmail

Café Comments?

Our comment policy requires that you use your real first and last names and provide an email address (your email will not be published). Comments that use non-PG rated language, include personal attacks, that are not provable as fact or that we deem in any way to be counter to our mission of fostering respectful dialogue will not be posted.

2 Comments
Newest
Oldest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Jim Naughton

I got something entirely different from this, Paul. I thought the fact that these three guys have a real relationship and weren’t just talking heads put on a panel due to the needs of the moment really came through. I also thought they both spoke with real insight and passion about the work they thought they could do.

Paul Woodrum

I watched the five minutes MSNBC gave these guys. From their evading what they must have known would be the first question, ‘Why do bad things happen to good people?’ secularism was given a holiday boost.

Facebooktwitterrss
Support the Café
Past Posts
2020_012
2020_013_B
2020_013_A

The Episcopal Café seeks to be an independent voice, reporting and reflecting on the Episcopal Church and the Anglican tradition.  The Café is not a platform of advocacy, but it does aim to tell the story of the church from the perspective of Progressive Christianity.  Our collective sympathy, as the Café, lies with the project of widening the circle of inclusion within the church and empowering all the baptized for the role to which they have been called as followers of Christ.

The opinions expressed at the Café are those of individual contributors, and, unless otherwise noted, should not be interpreted as official statements of a parish, diocese or other organization. The art and articles that appear here remain the property of their creators.

All Content  © 2017 Episcopal Café