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Help and prayers for Christians in Iraq

Help and prayers for Christians in Iraq

The Diocese of Cyprus and the Gulf and Anglican Vicar Andrew White plead for prayers and help for Christians in Iraq. From ENS:

In the wake of the growing crisis in Iraq, a plea for prayer and help has been issued by the Diocese of Cyprus and the Gulf and the Anglican vicar of St George’s Church in Baghdad.

Iraq_-_Location_Map_%282013%29_-_IRQ_-_UNOCHA.svg.pngAn estimated half a million people, including hundreds of Christian families, are fleeing the area with many attempting to find refuge in the nearby Kurdish provinces of Northern Iraq. At least one Assyrian church in Mosul has been burned down in the recent violence.

A statement from the diocese said that Christians are feeling particularly vulnerable, “especially in light of the treatment of Christians in the Raqqah province of northern Syria where ISIS* has also established its authority.

see more below:

The statement said Christians in the country have asked for prayer for the following issues:

The Christians of Mosul will know the close presence of Jesus, the guidance of the Spirit and the protection of the Father

Those who have chosen to remain in the city would not be subjected to violent or unjust treatment

Humanitarian assistance would reach all who are in need, whether having been displaced or remaining in Mosul

Christians throughout Iraq will know the peace and presence of Jesus each day, and will remain faithful to him and clear in their testimony

The Iraqi authorities will act decisively to improve security for all citizens of Iraq.

Anglican vicar of St George’s Church in Baghdad, Canon Andrew White, also issued an appeal entitled “Please, please help us in this crisis”. Canon White who has lost hundreds of his congregation to the violence over the years, said Iraq was facing its worst crisis since 2003.

For more from Canon Andrew White follow on Facebook.

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