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The Episcopal Café is an independent voice, reporting and reflecting on the Episcopal Church and the Anglican Communion. The Café aims to tell the story of progressive Christianity in the Anglican tradition. It is, at heart, a ministry of witness and testimony because we believe that following Christ compels us share the story of God’s work with and in the world.

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Emily Windsor

. . . when this moderator halts the process of censorship, of which I have a belly full. Not til then, sorry. 🙂 I have no parish to go to, Sundays. This is all there is for me, out here in the countryside. And it has become a strain on my spiritual resources, to fail continually or able to be found politically correct enough that I can actually get a friendly greeting or comment. Wanna talk about it? [phone number deleted by Cafe editor] one spirit to another?

Emily Windsor

JC Fisher

Might I recommend, for online worship:

http://dailyoffice.org/

http://saintlaika.com/podcasts/

David Streever

Emily:
Censorship is the official suppression of content in accordance with public morality. While I have “unapproved” your posts, it has never been because I disagreed with the morality; rather, I disagreed with the relevancy of your comments in the context of the stories you chose to post them on.

No blog is under any moral or legal obligation to provide you a platform for your varied and inchoate expressions; you are not silenced and have many other platforms on which you express yourself. Not every expression is appropriate, or interesting, on every platform.

When you are on topic and avoid derailing, we typically let your comments stand. When you post speculation unsupported by fact, or rehash your personal ideology on a story that is only tenuously related, we oftentimes moderate your comments, because they stand in stark contrast to our goal of providing a platform for conversations.

This isn’t an official statement by the site, but rather, my perspective in moderating your comments when it’s my turn to do so.

Thank you!

JC Fisher

OK, Sad Lab face is cheating… ;-X

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The Episcopal Café seeks to be an independent voice, reporting and reflecting on the Episcopal Church and the Anglican tradition.  The Café is not a platform of advocacy, but it does aim to tell the story of the church from the perspective of Progressive Christianity.  Our collective sympathy, as the Café, lies with the project of widening the circle of inclusion within the church and empowering all the baptized for the role to which they have been called as followers of Christ.

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