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Happy St Nicholas Day

Happy St Nicholas Day

Did you put out your shoes? What did you find in them? A coin? or? Does your church celebrate this day? A celebration was held in Canterbury December 4.

Hundreds lined the streets of Canterbury to enjoy the 12th annual St Nicholas Festival parade on Saturday.


The patron saint of children himself waved to the crowds alongside the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams and Bishop of Dover, the Rt Rev Trevor Willmott as the parade made its way from Westgate Towers through the city centre to the Cathedral.

The St. Nicholas Center offers “the real St. Nicholas” and lots of information about this popular saint.

From Wikipedia:

Legends and folklore

Another legend tells how a terrible famine struck the island and a malicious butcher lured three little children into his house, where he slaughtered and butchered them, placing their remains in a barrel to cure, planning to sell them off as ham. Saint Nicholas, visiting the region to care for the hungry, not only saw through the butcher’s horrific crime but also resurrected the three boys from the barrel by his prayers.

Another version of this story, possibly formed around the eleventh century, claims that the butcher’s victims were instead three clerks who wished to stay the night. The man murdered them, and was advised by his wife to dispose of them by turning them into meat pies. The Saint saw through this and brought the men back to life.

In his most famous exploit, a poor man had three daughters but could not afford a proper dowry for them. This meant that they would remain unmarried and probably, in absence of any other possible employment would have to become prostitutes. Hearing of the poor man’s plight, Nicholas decided to help him but being too modest to help the man in public (or to save the man the humiliation of accepting charity), he went to his house under the cover of night and threw three purses (one for each daughter) filled with gold coins through the window opening into the man’s house.

One version has him throwing one purse for three consecutive nights. Another has him throw the purses over a period of three years, each time the night before one of the daughters comes of age. Invariably, the third time the father lies in wait, trying to discover the identity of their benefactor. In one version the father confronts the saint, only to have Saint Nicholas say it is not him he should thank, but God alone. In another version, Nicholas learns of the poor man’s plan and drops the third bag down the chimney instead; a variant holds that the daughter had washed her stockings that evening and hung them over the embers to dry, and that the bag of gold fell into the stocking.

From Speaking to the Soul, more on St. Nicholas.

From the St Nicholas Center – fun things to do with kids here.

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David Kendrick

When our son was younger, we out gifts in his shoe. Now that he's in college, we send him a package. At our parish this past Sunday, a friend of the parish came, put on the red chasuble and a bishop's mitre, and became Bishop Nicholas for the children

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