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Five South Carolina bishops write state residents

Five South Carolina bishops write state residents

Five bishops in South Carolina – representing the Episcopal Church, the ELCA, the United Methodist Church and the Catholic Church – “have written an open letter to the state’s residents, urging reform of the public education system and rescue of children mired in poverty and hopelessness.”

The State:

“Even in the most successful of school districts, too many students underachieve, or worse, fall through the cracks and do not achieve success. All too easily they can become caught in the grip of poverty.”

The letter is signed by the Rev. Dr. Herman R. Yoos III, bishop of the S.C. Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America; the Rt. Rev. W. Andrew Waldo,bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Upper South Carolina; the Rt. Rev. Charles Glenn vonRosenberg, bishop of the Episcopal Church in South Carolina; the Most Rev. Robert E. Guglielmone, bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Charleston; and the Rev. L. Jonathan Holston, bishop of the S.C. Conference of the United Methodist Church.

The five comprise the South Carolina network known as LARCUM, an ecumenical group of Lutherans, Anglicans, Roman Catholics and United Methodists.

In the past, Yoos said, LARCUM leaders have gathered twice a year for a meal and dialogue. But the situation in the public schools, particularly along the I-95 corridor, known as the Corridor of Shame, has prompted them to take on education.

Read more.

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Rev. Dr. Herman R. Yoos III, bishop of the S.C. Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America; Rt. Rev. W. Andrew Waldo, bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Upper South Carolina; the Most Rev. Robert E. Guglielmone, bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Charleston; the Rt. Rev. Charles Glenn vonRosenberg, bishop of the Episcopal Church in South Carolina; and the Rev. L. Jonathan Holston, bishop of the S.C. Conference of the United Methodist Church.

Photo Credit: LARCUM

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