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Fallow

Fallow

The Speaking to the Soul blog is on hiatus this week to celebrate Vicki Black’s four years of service to the Cafe. Vicki posted the last of her 1,557 entries on the Soul blog on Pentecost Sunday, and we invite you to read it and leave her a note in the comments, either there, or here. The Soul blog will reopen under new management next week.

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Donald Schell

Vicki,I left comments from time to time but not nearly as often as your selections, a surprising word from a familiar saint or teacher or something that hit home from someone I'd not really registered or noticed before was that day's sign of hope and promise, the historic and contemporary witness of the Spirit still speaking.

Your Ephrem passage on the Baptism of Christ traveled with me and a group of pilgrims who went to visit the ancient Christian sites and to spend Timkat (Ethiopian celebration of the Baptism of Christ) with the Patriarch. We read and re-read that passage you'd offered in our liturgies and meditations that began or ended or days. The Ethiopians credit early Syrian missionaries with shaping their church culture. Timkat's the biggest celebration of their church year because of the cosmic theology of Christ's baptism - exactly what you offered us from Ephrem. So many more I could thank you for. And daily!?! Such a generous offering of spiritual/historical/intellectual feast. Thank you.

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