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Faith, politics and Washington National Cathedral

Faith, politics and Washington National Cathedral

The Rev. Frank Wade, interim dean of Washington National Cathedral, talks with Deborah Potter of Religion and Ethics Newsweekly about the cathedral’s recent $5 million gift from the Lily Foundation for earthquake repairs, and its correspondence with President Barack Obama and Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney about the the role of faith in their lives.


An excerpt:

You know, Governor Romney and President Obama both have grown up and formed their faith in different ways, certainly, but formed their faith in marginalized churches in our society, and so that constitutes a limit on the worldview that you get in that place. Now these are very broad strokes and very, you know, very generalized things. Both of these people from those churches have felt a call to serve this nation and the other and the world in wonderful, wonderful ways. But their faith communities have within them an intense inner loyalty that comes to a marginalized church, and that’s somewhat of a limitation. It obviously has not limited these two people.

Watch Faith, Politics, and the National Cathedral on PBS. See more from Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly.

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Bill Dilworth

It's my understanding that the President came to Christian faith in the United Church of Christ. Since when is the UCC "marginalized"?

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