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Faith-based predictions for 2012

Faith-based predictions for 2012

CNN’s Belief blog invited pundits and scholars to contribute to a list of 15 faith-based predictions for 2012. As a collection, they are pretty self-serving, but here are three that caught our eye:

There’s no question the worldview of most younger Christians already differs from previous generations regarding social justice, cultural engagement and politics. The next issue of probable divergence? The conflict in Israel and Palestine. The American church has largely purported just one theology about the modern state of Israel, but now questions are being asked – especially by younger Christians learning of persecution and human rights issues happening in the region – if the church should have a more active role in peacemaking. Is there a way for the Church to be pro-Israel, pro-Palestine and pro-peace?

–Cameron Strang, publisher of RELEVANT magazine

7. Significant numbers of millennials (young people born in the 1980s and 1990s) will continue to walk away from socially conservative religious traditions. Bringing them back will be tough, especially for religious organizations deeply invested in brick-and-mortar and bureaucracy. Millennials who are facing the erosion of access to affordable, quality education and meaningful employment and who stand to inherit from their elders a great deal of debt and environmental destruction want to know why and how faith matters.

–Joanna Brooks, Mormon author and columnist for Religion Dispatches

11. More churches will lose the moat dragon mentality, lower the drawbridge and dispatch members beyond the church service to church SERVICE, applying their faith in the community through volunteerism and outreach.

–A. Larry Ross, Christian communications executive representing clients like Billy Graham and Rick Warren

How about you, do you have any predictions about what will happen in the world of religion this year? We will be featuring a specifically Episcopal variation on this story in a few hours.

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A Facebook User

Thank you for sharing my 2012 Faith-based prediction with your readers.

FYI, due to a glitch in their system over the holidays, my faith forecast you reference above was only a partial posting, which the editors have since fixed and updated to reflect my entire, three-fold submission covering trends toward a return to authentic faith, applied faith and an emphasis on global prayer for peace and reconciliation, as follows:

“Occu-pew Church" – a movement away from counterfeit "Church-ianity," cult of personality and religion toward authentic grassroots personal faith, based on living and loving like Jesus. More churches will lose the moat dragon mentality, lower the drawbridge and dispatch members beyond the church service to church SERVICE, applying their faith in the community through volunteerism and outreach. A renewed global emphasis on prayer - especially for peace and reconciliation - as individuals and leaders recognize that personal spiritual peace in one's heart provides the only lasting foundation for physical peace among families, friends, neighbors - even nations.

–A. Larry Ross, Christian communications executive representing clients like Billy Graham and Rick Warren

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