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Evangelicals for Marriage Equality

Evangelicals for Marriage Equality

Time Magazine reports on a new organization of Evangelicals For Marriage Equality and why they are starting an initiative for evangelicals to support civil marriage equality:

EME is the first organization of its kind that is specifically focused on creating conversations within evangelical churches, colleges, and institutions to help dispel myths about marriage equality and stake out a middle ground for young evangelicals in this contentious debate. It was founded by two young, straight evangelicals –Josh Dickson and Michael Saltsman—who grew up in the church and have an appreciation for both its strengths and its weaknesses.

As spokesperson for the organization, I represent a growing number of millennial evangelicals that believes it’s possible to be a faithful Christian with a high regard for the authority of the Bible and a faithful supporter of civil marriage equality.

According to data from the Public Religion Research Institute, evangelicals register the lowest level of support for same-sex marriage of any religious denomination. … But within this topline statistic, there’s considerable generational diversity. For instance, 43 percent of evangelicals in the 18-to 33-year-old demographic … support marriage equality.

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