Episcopal Church Bishops pro-#DACA ad in New York Times and why yours might not be listed

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From Episcopal News Service:

More on the story of the New York Times ad and who signed. See reasons why you might not see your bishop even though she or he is supportive of a permanent solution for those who were children brought to the US with their parents, who have no other home now, and their need for a path to a full life in the US. Episcopal Café has the ad here.

Some 125 Episcopal Church bishops signed a full-page ad that ran Sept. 21 in the New York Times, imploring President Donald Trump and member of Congress not to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, the program known as DACA…

The Rev. Richard Witt, executive director of Rural & Migrant Ministries, brought the idea to the Rt. Rev. Lawrence C. Provenzano, bishop of the Diocese of Long Island. His diocese is among, if not, the most diverse in the church, in part because Queens, New York is the most diverse county in nation….

Starting with Witt and Provenzano, then adding three other bishops, they organized the declaration and after Curry agreed, they sent an email through their list serve to all bishops with a deadline to sign on. It’s unclear the reason some bishops didn’t sign the statement, but if it wasn’t about avoiding controversy, it could have been as simple as not noticing the email in time to make the deadline.

“I heard from bishops up until Tuesday morning, and it was submitted to the New York Times Tuesday (Sept. 19) afternoon,” said Denise Fillion, Long Island’s diocesan director of communications. Fillion helped with the final edits on the ad.

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David G. Duggan
Guest

Curiously, neither IL bishop is among the signatories (Lee, Chicago; Martins, Springfield), but the retired Bp of Chicago, Persell, is, without noting his status. The short answer is that the DACAs are law-breakers and while we may rue the law, compliance is required by our faith-Romans 13. The civil rights protestors of 50+ years ago risked-and incurred-arrest to establish the unfairness of the law and thereby secured the moral high ground. The unfairness of this law may be compounded by the fact that the DACAs' parents brought them here, and in that respect the DACAs are law-breakers by proxy, but in many other respects, children bear the consequences of the sins of their fathers-Num. 14:18-bankruptcy, incarceration, alcoholism. Immigration should be of no difference.

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Robert Chapman
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Robert Chapman

To quote Charles Dickens, the law is an ass. It has one solution for every problem. That solution isn't always the right solution if you want justice done.

To get around the law being an ass, prosecutors always have the decision on whether or not to prosecute. Judges, within reason, can dismiss charges or sentence accordingly (being able to rationally give reason for any departure). There is such a thing as jury nullification, where I jury can decide to not convict when they see a problem with the law.

Why do people think that one this one issue, we must hold to the law absolutely as written. Whatever happened to mercy to go with justice, something Scripture calls us to do.

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Prof Christopher Seitz
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Prof Christopher Seitz

This would be the Charles Dickens who abandoned his wife, had an afffair with a needy actress, who gave birth to his child and struggled to maintain her sanity.

Yes, the law had to be an ass for that kind of late life decision making. See the film "Invisible Woman."

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Bob Chapman
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Bob Chapman

Do you know what "ad hominem" means? Dickens' personal life has nothing to do with the correctness of the idea.

There are many people I would never recommend that anyone should follow as examples of good living. That doesn't mean that this person didn't observe something valuable.

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Prof Christopher Seitz
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Prof Christopher Seitz

Wrong. You intoned "the law is an ass" as if this had some probative character because Charles Dickens so proclaimed! The idea is nonsense.

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Rod Gillis
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Rod Gillis

" Bah, Humbug"

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Greg Rickel
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Greg Rickel

I was disheartened to not have my name on this letter but alas you cannot sign onto a letter which you are not invited to. Since my "surprise" about this letter and some concerned emails from some of the people in my diocese, I have done a good deal of research only to find I was not on the listserv utilized to issue the invitation. I can say I would have signed it in a heartbeat, but I would have to receive an invitation in order to make that a reality. I completely support the letter and all that is calls us to. Greg Rickel, Bishop of Olympia

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