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English fashion designer launches clerical line for women

English fashion designer launches clerical line for women

A London-trained fashion designer has launched a new range of clerical wear for women in the Church of England.

RNS:


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Camelle Daley, who founded the label House of ilona, says it’s high time for a shake-up among Anglican clergy who, like Roman Catholic priests, still wear traditional black shirt and collar.

Daley said she got the idea when a recently ordained friend said she wanted a new look for a new age.

The result?

Daley’s collection, now selling briskly, includes peplum dresses and tops, classic black dresses and a fitted green blouse with chiffon detail.

She has received hundreds of orders from women, who now make up one-third of the clergy in this country’s established church.

“Today, more than ever, women in ministry are complaining about the boxy, shapeless shirts on offer,” she said. “Why should a woman’s style go from stylish and elegant to manly and boxy when she is dressed in her clerical attire for ministering?”

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Paul Woodrum

Unfortunate British speak and not French speak.

John B. Chilton
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