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Edit wars on Wikipedia’s religion pages

Edit wars on Wikipedia’s religion pages

On Wikipedia, as in others parts of daily life, religion is a contentious topic. For some administrators of the sight who are also people of faith, taking part in Wikipedia presents many difficulties:

The problem confronting many Wikipedia editors is that religion elicits passion — and often, more than a little vitriol as believers and critics spar over facts, sources and context. For “Wikipedians” like Willey, trying to put a lid on the online hate speech that can be endemic to Wikipedia entries is a key part of their job.

Religion is among several of the top 100 altered topics on Wikipedia, according to a recent list published by Five Thirty Eight. Former President George W. Bush is the most contested entry, but Jesus (No. 5) and the Catholic Church (No. 7) fall closely behind.

Islam’s Prophet Muhammad (No. 35) and Pope John Paul II (No. 82) are included, as well as all manner of religions, like Jehovah’s Witnesses, Islam, Christianity and Scientology. And countries and topics with religious sensitivities are also controversial, including global warming and Israel.

For the full article from the Huffington Post, please visit here.

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Paul Woodrum

Recently I looked up Park Slope, Brooklyn, NY, on Wiki. Under religious institutions four synagogues were listed and not a single Christian Church, not even St. John's Episcopal founded in 1826, the first religious institution in that part of Brooklyn.

I understand that this is not Wiki's fault and hope St. John's and other Christian religious institutions will submit their information for inclusion.

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