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Disturber of the Peace: a new documentary on Malcolm Boyd

Disturber of the Peace: a new documentary on Malcolm Boyd

Gary Yerkey of the Chrisitan Science Monitor writes:

Los Angeles filmmaker Andrew Thomas has turned his attention from the secular to the religious by directing a feature-length documentary on the life and times of the Rev. Malcolm Boyd, an Episcopal priest who says the church needs to be more relevant to the everyday person and has worked to improve that issue.


Thomas, who has created, produced and written series for A&E and the Discovery Channel, said he plans to release a preview of the film, “Disturber of the Peace,” at the Palm Springs Gay and Lesbian Film Festival in California on Sept. 21 and expects to release the film at selected theaters across the country early next year.

He said the film will contain extensive past and present-day exclusive footage of Boyd, who turned 90 years old on June 8, along with interviews with those who knew and and worked with him during his long career, including political activist Tom Hayden and actress Lily Tomlin.

Boyd, author of Are You Running with Me, Jesus?, a book that made him a national celebrity in the 1960s, is writer-in-residence at the Cathedral Center of St. Paul in the Diocese of Los Angeles.

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