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Discussing faith and belief

Discussing faith and belief

Andrew Marr on BBC Radio 4 discusses the nature of faith and belief with Jonathan Safran Foer, Richard Holloway, Karen Armstrong and Helen Edmundson, who all live outside of their traditional faiths and in the agnostic middle ground.

On Start the Week Andrew Marr discusses faith and doubt. Richard Holloway started training for the priesthood from the age of 14, but as the former Bishop looks back on his life he reveals a restless spirit, always questioning his beliefs. Karen Armstrong has had similar crises of faith, and asks in a forthcoming talk, ‘What is Religion?’ For the 17th century Mexican nun, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, faith was wrapped up in her love of writing and poetry – her life is brought to the stage by the playwright Helen Edmundson. And Jonathan Safran Foer celebrates the Jewish text Haggadah which tells the story of the Exodus to the Promised Land.

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Gary Paul Gilbert

There is another interview with Richard Holloway on BBC Radio 3 about his new book.

The link is

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b01c9qt5/Night_Waves_Richard_Holloway/

or

http://tinyurl.com/6uls8x5

The blurb is

In Night Waves this evening Philip Dodd explores the boundaries between faith and doubt. His expert guides in this vast territory are the former bishop, Richard Holloway and the writers, Jonathan Safran Foer and Howard Jacobson.

Gary Paul Gilbert

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Simon Sarmiento

That would be BBC Radio 4. BBC4 is the name of a digital TV channel, quite separate from its Radio namesake.

Thanks Simon. Fixed. ~ed.

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