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Discomfort over Francis strains ties in the American religious right

Discomfort over Francis strains ties in the American religious right

While the new tone coming out of the Vatican has drawn plaudits from progressives, it has also driven a wedge into the powerful political alliance between conservative Catholics and evangelical Christians.

BuzzFeed.com:

As political spectators gawk at the “civil war” currently engulfing congressional Republicans in the wake of the government shutdown, a potentially more consequential rift is beginning to form within the party’s traditional coalition of conservative Christian value voters. Blame the Vicar of Christ.

In a series of interviews earlier this year, Pope Francis repeatedly signaled a desire for his flock to disengage from the culture wars — complaining that the church had become “obsessed” with issues like marriage and abortion, actively seeking common ground with atheists, and even appearing to flirt with moral relativism. While the new tone coming out of the Vatican has drawn plaudits from progressives, it has also driven a wedge into the powerful political alliance between conservative Catholics and evangelical Christians that’s been instrumental in electing hundreds of Republicans over the past four decades.

Bryan Fischer, a senior analyst at the American Family Association and devout Christian, said he was “disappointed and alarmed at some of the things the pope said” — a sentiment shared by many of the protestant culture warriors on America’s religious right.

“It raises questions in our mind because the Catholic Church has always been a faithful shoulder-to-shoulder ally to social conservatives in the fight to protect unborn human life” and the sanctity of marriage, Fischer said. “We simply have questions of whether we’ll be able to count on the Catholic Church to be comrades-in-arms to continue to fight these battles.”

Russell Moore, president of the Southern Baptist Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, struggled to find theological justification for the pope’s comments. In a column earlier this month, he concluded that Francis was guilty of “severing the love of God from the holiness of God” — even as he mused that he was not interested in “refighting the Protestant Reformation.”

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tgflux

Bryan Fischer is the leader of an SPLC-certified HATE GROUP. He's many things, but "devout Christian" (in the sense of modelling himself after Jesus of Nazareth) is not one of them.

JC Fisher

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Richard III

"Bryan Fischer, a senior analyst at the American Family Association and devout Christian" - BuzzFeed would probably never proffer an opinion about Mr. Fischer as an example of what a devout Christian is, however I will. Occasionally I listen to Mr. Fischer on the radio when I'm driving home from work and I would like let others, who don't know much about him, know that he is one of the most ardent and vitriolic gay haters I've ever listened to. What he espouses has nothing to do with what my understanding of being a Christian is all about and if there really is such a place as Hell I feel confident he has a room already made up for him.

Richard Warren

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Jesse Snider

Aside from a possible change in approach what has changed in Rome? It's refreshing to hear Rome address social issues esp. for the poor and children. However I think we're lightyears away from a nun who's had an abortion performing a gay marriage in the Vatican. They should all just calm down.

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