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Diocese of Central Ecuador leadership to resign

Diocese of Central Ecuador leadership to resign

And, more news from the House of Bishops’ meeting:

Diocese of Central Ecuador leadership to resign

Presiding bishop appoints Victor Scantlebury interim bishop

From Episcopal News Service

For the “sake of the diocese” the leadership of the Episcopal Diocese of Central Ecuador – including members of the Standing Committee, Bishop Luis Fernando Ruiz, the chancellor, its legal representative and all other diocesan leaders – have agreed to resign by Oct. 1.

Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori Sept. 20 convened a meeting of the leadership, along with Bishop Victor Scantlebury and Bishop Clay Matthews, the Episcopal Church’s bishop for pastoral development, at the Hilton Colón Hotel in Quito, where the agreement was reached.

By resigning their positions, the leadership yields its authority to the presiding bishop; she appointed Scantlebury, who had served as an assisting bishop in the Diocese of Chicago until he retired July 1 to serve as interim bishop.

The announcement was made to the House of Bishops, which has been holding its fall meeting Sept. 15-20 in Quito, during its business session. Jefferts Schori, Scantlebury and Matthews have been holding meetings with the Central Ecuador leadership throughout the six-day meeting.

“They have been advising me to think about my resignation,” said Ruiz in Spanish through an interpreter. “This is something that really hurts me … but as I have been saying, if this will contribute to calm in the diocese, and I can get my life back in order.

“I came here thinking the Lord had a plan for me, but now I don’t know. I am worried about what I will do afterward.”

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Jim Naughton

I have no idea what actually happened, and I have no problem with the PB strongly urging an action on the diocese. This was a difficult situation and I am glad it seems to have been resolved.

What I am concerned about is the notion that dioceses can yield or cede authority to the office of the Presiding Bishop in a case like this. I would not like that to become a common understanding of how our polity works because I don't believe it is accurate.

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Ann Fontaine

There is a Canon that allows for this.

Canon III.13.2.

The question remains - did the Standing Committee invite Bishop Scantlebury or did the PB make this decision? There must have been some prior plan to have it happen so quickly

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Jim Naughton

I don't understand this paragraph:

"By resigning their positions, the leadership yields its authority to the presiding bishop; she appointed Scantlebury, who had served as an assisting bishop in the Diocese of Chicago until he retired July 1 to serve as interim bishop."

I think we needed to find a way to fix a difficult situation, and I like Bishop Scantlebury, but can someone explain to me how a diocese goes about "yielding" its authority to the presiding bishop. I am not an expert in canons, but I don't think dioceses are able to decide to whom they "yield" authority.

I am happy to be corrected on this, but I would hate to see us manufacturing principles that grant more central authority to the office of the PB because we needed a one time fix.

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