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Dear Lulu

Dear Lulu

The Telegraph’s Damian Thompson shares a story of a little girl writing a letter to God and the response she got when her dad forwarded it to “the head of theology of the Anglican Communion, based at Lambeth Palace.”

There’s a charming article in today’s Times by Alex Renton, a non-believer who sends his six-year-old daughter Lulu to a Scottish church primary school. Her teachers asked her to write the following letter: “To God, How did you get invented?” The Rentons were taken aback: “We had no idea that a state primary affiliated with a church would do quite so much God,” says her father. He could have told Lulu that, in his opinion, there was no God; or he could have pretended that he was a believer. He chose to do neither, instead emailing her letter to the Scottish Episcopal Church (no reply), the Presbyterians (ditto) and the Scottish Catholics (a nice but theologically complex answer). For good measure, he also sent it to “the head of theology of the Anglican Communion, based at Lambeth Palace” – and this was the response:

Dear Lulu,

Your dad has sent on your letter and asked if I have any answers. It’s a difficult one! But I think God might reply a bit like this –

‘Dear Lulu – Nobody invented me – but lots of people discovered me and were quite surprised. They discovered me when they looked round at the world and thought it was really beautiful or really mysterious and wondered where it came from. They discovered me when they were very very quiet on their own and felt a sort of peace and love they hadn’t expected.

Then they invented ideas about me – some of them sensible and some of them not very sensible. From time to time I sent them some hints – specially in the life of Jesus – to help them get closer to what I’m really like.

But there was nothing and nobody around before me to invent me. Rather like somebody who writes a story in a book, I started making up the story of the world and eventually invented human beings like you who could ask me awkward questions!’

And then he’d send you lots of love and sign off.

I know he doesn’t usually write letters, so I have to do the best I can on his behalf. Lors of love from me too.

+Archbishop Rowan

I think this letter reveals a lot about the Archbishop of Canterbury’s sort of theology – more, indeed, than many of his lectures or agonised Synod addresses. I’d be interested to know whether readers of this blog think he did a good job of answering Lulu’s question.

But what the letter also tells us is that the Archbishop took the trouble to write a really thoughtful message – unmistakably his work and not that of a secretary – to a little girl. “Well done, Rowan!” was the reaction of Alex Renton’s mother, and I agree.

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Adam Spencer

I think a great many people (including parishioners at my church, some of my fellow commentators on this blog and myself, from time to time) can see only the Archbishop’s failures and less-than-wonderful moments as a leader in our Church around sexuality and equality. He becomes a symbol of What’s Wrong and an opponent to stand against. We forget, I think, that he (like us) is also a human person. He falls down, he fails, he sins and he’s less than any of us (including himself, I’d wager) would like him to be. But, as a human person, he’s also on occasion capable of acting in ways that are beautiful and good beyond the telling of it. I’m grateful when I remember this undeniable fact of our common humanity; whether it is concerning Archbishops, co-workers, family, friends, enemies or, maybe most of all, myself.

tgflux

When +Rowan is good he is very very good.

…and when he is bad, he is horrid!

[Sorry, couldn’t resist that bit o’ doggerel. ;-p]

JC Fisher

Bill Moorhead

When +Rowan is good he is very very good. And this time he was very very good.

(+David? ???)

Terry Pannell

Simple and lovely. The truth often is.

Terry Pannell+

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