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Dean Mike Kinman faults Missouri ruling on survivor benefits

Dean Mike Kinman faults Missouri ruling on survivor benefits

The Rev. Mike Kinman, dean of Christ Church Cathedral in St. Louis, believes the Missouri Supreme Court was wrong to rule that the partner of a Missouri highway patrolman killed in the line of duty is not entitled to survivor benefits from the state pension system. Kinman writes:

Kelly and Dennis were parishioners of ours at Christ Church Cathedral. Dennis is buried in our memorial chapel and to this day, Kelly remains a part of this community. Like many other couples of same and differing sexes in our congregation whose commitment to one another is absolute and whose love for one another witnesses to Christ’s love for the world, make no mistake, Kelly and Dennis were married. Not in a way that was recognized by the state. Not even in a way that was recognized by the Episcopal Church. But in ways that count on that human level — in the eyes of one another, in the eyes of their community, and in the eyes of God.

Read his column in its entirety here.

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tgflux

I'd say this was tragic, but it's more than that: it's criminal.

The five judges who voted against giving survivor benefits to Kelly should resign: they've failed their raison d'etre, which is JUSTICE.

JC Fisher

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