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Dakota Access Pipeline Company Attacks Native American Protesters with Dogs & Pepper Spray

Dakota Access Pipeline Company Attacks Native American Protesters with Dogs & Pepper Spray

A protest in North Dakota which has received widespread support from the Episcopal Church and Anglican Church of Canada and that is led by native peoples seeking to protect sacred lands, has been marred by violence as private security hired by the pipeline corporation used pepper spray and dogs in an attempt to halt the protest at the construction site.

See our earlier stories here, here and here

 

 

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Dan Jarvis

Jon I dont think so...not this time. Too many Nations have come together over this. That part of it is quite thrilling Many nations One voice Very aprop that is happening at Standing rock. The First People are standing together in a way that hasnt happened in a long time.

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Jon Randolph

This what's called a "shakedown". Once the oil company spreads a little money around, the sacredness and the story will fade away.

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Dan Jarvis

UPDATE
I am so pissed I can hardly stand it...this is what those oil bulldozers were doing, and why the dogs were set loose.

Accouple of weeks ago, the owner of much land that the DAPL is scheduled to lay pipe, asked experts to survey his land for any sacred sites, burial sites etc. Several were found..all was documented and sent to a the state and the army corp. with gps locations.
Now, the DAPL diggers were many miles away. But with the news of found sacred sites, they "leapfrogged" their equipment directly over to the nearest sacred site, and began to bulldoze it.
The natives heard the tractors and gathered to protect the site. That is when the security began the dog and pepper assault. Meanwhile, the local law stood off at a distance and allowed all to happen.
And none of it gets in the national news...I am beside myself, this white guy is seeing red

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Mark Ash

Outside of Democracy Now, and precious few other exceptions, journalism does not exist within our borders in 2016 ... very unfortunate.

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Daniel Jarvis

what Ive said before... perhaps some think Im over reacting consider
Violence begets violence escalates

level 1 passive aggresive cutting off access roads, withdraw water supply, recalling refuse removal
level 2 pepper spray and attack dogs
what will be level 3? level 4 level 5

using dogs how inhumane
to the natives, and to the dogs

there is country wisdom that states once a dog tastes human blood, it should be put down

also how telling that we are not seeing this on the national media after all, NDNs are invisible
Pray that the fed court halts this and also pray that a certain racist doesnt become prez.. can you imajine how the Donald would respond to uppity injuns

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